Perfect Cubes

Time Limit: Java: 10000 ms / Others: 10000 ms

Memory Limit: Java: 32768 KB / Others: 32768 KB

Description

For hundreds of years Fermat's Last Theorem, which stated simply that for n > 2 there exist no integers a, b, c > 1 such that a^n = b^n + c^n, has remained elusively unproven. (A recent proof is believed to be correct, though it is still undergoing scrutiny.) It is possible, however, to find integers greater than 1 that satisfy the ``perfect cube'' equation a^3 = b^3 + c^3 + d^3 (e.g. a quick calculation will show that the equation 12^3 = 6^3 + 8^3 + 10^3 is indeed true). This problem requires that you write a program to find all sets of numbers {a, b, c, d} which satisfy this equation for a <= 200.


Input

The output should be listed as shown below, one perfect cube per line, in non-decreasing order of a (i.e. the lines should be sorted by their a values). The values of b, c, and d should also be listed in non-decreasing order on the line itself. There do exist several values of a which can be produced from multiple distinct sets of b, c, and d triples. In these cases, the triples with the smaller b values should be listed first.

The first part of the output is shown here:

Cube = 6, Triple = (3,4,5)
Cube = 12, Triple = (6,8,10)
Cube = 18, Triple = (2,12,16)
Cube = 18, Triple = (9,12,15)
Cube = 19, Triple = (3,10,18)
Cube = 20, Triple = (7,14,17)
Cube = 24, Triple = (12,16,20)

Note: The programmer will need to be concerned with an efficient implementation. The official time limit for this problem is 2 minutes, and it is indeed possible to write a solution to this problem which executes in under 2 minutes on a 33 MHz 80386 machine. Due to the distributed nature of the contest in this region, judges have been instructed to make the official time limit at their site the greater of 2 minutes or twice the time taken by the judge's solution on the machine being used to judge this problem.

Output

None

Sample Input

None

Sample Output

None

Hint

None

Source

Mid-Central USA 1995

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